Review – Side by Side

25723222Side by Side

Christopher Kenneally

2012, USA

A documentary chronicling the history, process, influence and practicality of photochemical and digital film. Narrated by Keanu Reeves who interviews some of the most successful and popular directors and cinematographers in the industry, the documentary explores how digital filmmaking is shaping the future of cinema.

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Contemporary Korean history for the Commodore 64 generation

If you enjoy a bit of history but are more of a watcher than a reader then read on.

South Korean game company Studio Shelter have put together a demo for a (fictional) game titled ‘Democracy Demo’. If you were part of the ‘8-bit generation’ and grew up with the likes of ‘Street Fighter’ and the original ‘Mario’ you will swoon with nostalgic delight at this video which humorously (and quite accurately) depicts the modern history of South Korea from the end of Japanese occupation (1945) to the present day. Knowing a thing or two about South Korea helps (depicting former president Lee Myung-bak as a rat will please many) but it will entertain nonetheless.

Wilhelm Scream

I watched ‘The Hobbit’ today (review on its way) and somewhere in the middle I noticed the Wilhelm scream, so thought I would add some info for those unaware of the most famous soundbite in the film business.

The Wilhelm scream is a film and television stock sound effect that has been used in more than 200 movies, beginning in 1951 for the film Distant Drums. The scream is often used when someone is shot, falls from a great height, or is thrown from an explosion.

Apparently voiced by actor and singer Sheb Wooley, the sound is named after Private Wilhelm, a character in The Charge at Feather River, a 1953 western in which the character is shot with an arrow. This was believed to be the third movie to use the sound effect and its first use from the Warner Bros. stock sound library.

The effect gained new popularity (its use often becoming an in-joke) after it was used in Star Wars, the Indiana Jones series, Disney cartoons and many other blockbuster films as well as television programs and video games.

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Philip Roth – An Open Letter to Wikipedia

Dear Wikipedia,

I am Philip Roth. I had reason recently to read for the first time the Wikipedia entry discussing my novel “The Human Stain.” The entry contains a serious misstatement that I would like to ask to have removed. This item entered Wikipedia not from the world of truthfulness but from the babble of literary gossip—there is no truth in it at all.

Yet when, through an official interlocutor, I recently petitioned Wikipedia to delete this misstatement, along with two others, my interlocutor was told by the “English Wikipedia Administrator”—in a letter dated August 25th and addressed to my interlocutor—that I, Roth, was not a credible source: “I understand your point that the author is the greatest authority on their own work,” writes the Wikipedia Administrator—“but we require secondary sources.”

Thus was created the occasion for this open letter. After failing to get a change made through the usual channels, I don’t know how else to proceed.

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